HRSA makes it harder for NAP applicants to shoot themselves in the foot

Many of you are working on HRSA New Access Points (NAP) applications, and this year HRSA made a revealing change on page 3 of the FOA:

Form 2: Staffing Profile will no longer collect salary or federal funding data to reduce duplication with the Budget Justification Narrative. Fields have been added to collect information on use of contracted staff.

The phrase “to reduce duplication” implies that previous applicants would enter one set of positions in the Staffing Profile and another inconsistent set of positions in the Budget Justification Narrative. Those kinds of errors often lead to rejected proposals—even when the applicant does much else right. HRSA, to its credit, is trying to reduce the potential for such errors by putting salary information in one place, instead of two (or twelve: with the feds, trying to find all the places that must match is often challenging).

We’ve written before about the importance of internal consistency in grant proposals. Internal consistency is one of the most important aspects of a proposal. The other day I met with a client who is a grant-world novice and who provided a recently finished proposal she had written for a technical project concept. We were to use her previous proposal as a starting point for the new proposal we were writing. As we went over the budget, budget narrative, and program narrative of her old proposal, I pointed out several key inconsistencies, and those inconsistencies had likely caused the proposal to lose enough points to become non-fundable. I stressed that internal consistency is more important than perfect fidelity between proposal and project implementation.

Why? Most grant programs have some amount of slack in project implementation—that is, grant applications are proposals, and the actual activities may change (slightly). If you do slightly different project activities or have a slightly different staffing plan, you’ll be fine. With NAP, for example, it’s common for applicants to change sites after they’re funded. They might change a nurse practitioner to a family doc or vice-versa. As long as the funded applicant ultimately opens up a new primary health center and deliver primary health care, they’re going to be okay.

But to get that far, NAP applicants need internal proposal consistency as much as they need to demonstrate site control, even if they snag a different site later. Otherwise they’re unlikely to get funded, making the site issue moot.

One thought on “HRSA makes it harder for NAP applicants to shoot themselves in the foot”

  1. Eileen Lepro

    I’m so glad to hear this, especially as a health center CEO/grant writer and sometime grant reviewer for HRSA. I’ve often had to pose these kinds of questions during grant reviews, when the inconsistencies caused confusion about which set of figures is correct, or when project plan information conflicts in various locations throughout the proposal.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>